Monday, 13 February 2017

Torpet Farm - reaching goals with a new generation

As a child, Gustav Kämpe never thought he was going to be a farmer. He grew up sur-rounded by cows because his parents were dairy farmers, but seeing them work on the farm was not attractive to him. “I never wanted to do the hard work!” he admits and laughs.

Gustav Kämpe came back to Torpet Farm after more than ten years; it was a long journey, it took many years before he decided to be a dairy farmer, but when he made up his mind, he did it big.

Kämpe’s way back to manage the dairy family business is influenced by his university title as an environmental engineer, as well as by a job in one of the large agricultural companies in Sweden, and also by his wife, who loves farming life.

All these things together were crucial to bringing him back to the place he grew up. This time, he was eager to develop a new and progressive way of management. “I found a new view of how to be a farmer; it came from another perspective”, Kämpe says while mentioning that VikingGenetics is an important part of this new era at Torpet Farm.

He and his wife moved into the property eight years ago. The couple started a company to-gether with Gustav’s father, Kurt Kämpe, to manage the farm. Last summer, they bought the farm; And in one year, they have increased the number of cows from 100 to 200 and built a new barn with three milking robots.

“One of the goals for me and Sofia was to take care of the farm. We wanted to develop it. This has been the goal for the last eight years, and now we are here”, he adds.

A clear, long-term breeding plan
The Torpet farm is located in a flat and open property of 200 hectares land and 60 hectares of natural grass. The property is close to the water and surrounded by large trees.
The Kämpes have a long-term breeding plan that is al- ready positioning them on the map of progressive farms in Sweden.

The Torpet farm has a mixed herd, 60% VikingRed and 40% Holstein; production is 11,100 Energy Corrected Milk (ECM); putting them above the average in Sweden that is 10,452 kg ECM for Holsteins and 9,749 kg ECM for VikingRed.

The genetics from VikingGenetics are behind these exciting numbers; Gustav Kämpe has inseminated the females in the herd with X-Vik to increase the number of cows getting heifers by their own.

When selecting genetics for the next generation, Kämpe says they select traits such as yield and udder traits suitable for robots “We look very carefully at the NTM; this is the way you do a long-term breeding plan”, he states.

He also has a profitable plan for heifers that he is not going to use as mothers for the next generation of milking cows. He explains that since the price of meat is quite high, he insemi-nates them with beef.


Facts of the Torpet Farm
• Milk production: 11,100 kg ECM
• Protein: 3.6%
• Fat: 4.3%
• Three  milking robots
• Two  employees  and  one trainee
• 180 milking cows and goal is to increase to 200


Gustav Kämpe looks carefully at NTM "because this is the best way you do a longrerm breeding plan", he says.

The Torpet farm is located in a flat, open and large property - 200 hectares land and 60 hectares of natural grass.

The Torpet farm has a mixed herd, 60% VikingRed and 40% Holstein.

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